In this edition of Mark Hatton's SecurityWeek article, he discusses the balance between being too aggressive in implementing security policies.

In my previous article for SecurityWeek, I discussed how the city of Atlanta handled a recent snowstorm to illustrate the difference between having the information necessary to accurately predict events and taking proactive steps to alter or alleviate the outcome. The timing was particularly interesting because Atlanta had the chance to redeem themselves almost immediately with another large storm bearing down on them on the date of publication.

Given my new-found interest in how southern cities react to winter weather, I read a good deal of the news coverage on how they were applying lessons learned and if they would be taking a proactive stance towards this next storm. The passage below from a recent AP story sums it up quite well:

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal indicated on Monday that he and other state officials had learned their lesson. Before a single drop of freezing rain or snow fell, Deal declared a state of emergency for nearly a third of the state and state employees were told they could stay home if they felt conditions were too dangerous. Schools canceled classes, and Deal urged people who didn't need to be anywhere to stay off the roads. Tractor-trailer drivers were handed fliers about the weather and a law requiring chains on tires in certain conditions. "We are certainly ahead of the game this time, and that's important," Deal said. "We are trying to be ready, prepared and react as quickly as possible."

Now let me preface all of my by stating that I don’t have any special kind of insight into any decisions that were made, the data they had on hand or their ability to handle another weather emergency. The direction they provided may have been spot on and appropriate in this situation.

securityweek_logoHowever, I do want to use their reaction, even potential overreaction, to the second storm to make another point that I believe greatly impacts the role security professionals play in their organizations. As a society, we have a tendency to overreact. Whether in a business setting or in our daily lives, when something goes wrong, we generally overcompensate to ensure we are protected from the threat moving forward. While this may seem like the proper reaction to a threat at the time, it can also have wide-spread negative effects on the business.

To read the complete article, please follow this link:  http://www.securityweek.com/five-considerations-being-proactive-without-becoming-problem-yourself

Mark Hatton, President, CEO